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Chalo Delhi: Writing and Speeches 1943-1945 (Subhas Chandra Bose)
Chalo Delhi: Writing and Speeches 1943-1945 (Subhas Chandra Bose)
Description

About the Book

After a perilious ninety-day submarine voyage, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose arrived in Southest Asia on 6 May 1943 to lead the indian independence movement. 'Only when the blood of freedom loving Indians begins to flow', he declared in one of his broadcasts in June 1943,'Will India attain his freedom.' In his last message, on 15 August 1945, he urged faith in India's destiny and expressed confidence that 'India shall be free and before long.'

Volume 12 of Netaji's Collected Works brings together all his speeches and writings as leader of the Azad Hind movement from June 1943 to August 1945. His stirring speeches in Singapore, Malaya, and Burma electrified massive audiences of civilians and soldiers, united Indians of all religions, and insired them to join the march towards delhi.

The Proclamation of the Provisional Government of Azad Hind (Free India) in Singapore on 21 October 1943 blends erudition and passion. Netaji's radio address to the 'Father of Our Nation' provides the most detailed justification of his curse of action and seeks the Mahatma's blessings in the 'holy war' raging around Imphal and Kohima. The 'Tokyo thesis' delivered to university faculty and students in November1944 highlights the three supreme challenges for free India-national defence, eradication of poverty, and education for all. His letters-most published here for the young women and men who joined the Indian National Army.

This volume is indispensable for all interested in modern South Asian history and politics, as well as nationalism and international relations in the twentieth century.

About the Author

Sisir Kumar Bose (1920-2000) founded the Netaji Research Bureau in 1957 and was its guiding spirit until his death in 2000. A participant in the Indian freedom struggle, he was imprisoned by the British in the Lahore Fort, Red Fort, and Lyallpur Jail. In the post-independence period he played a key role in preserving the best traditions of he anti-colonial movement and making possible the writing of its history. He authored nad edited biographies, memoirs , monographs, and research papers on Netaji's life and times, One of India's best pediatricians, he was Director and later President of the Institute of Child Health, Calcutta.

Sugata Bose is the Gardiner Professor of History ot Horvard University. He is the author of several books on economic, social and political history, including A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (2006).

Introduction

On 6 May 1943, after a perilous 90-day submarine voyage, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose reached Sabang on the coast of Sumatra. The journey had begun on 8 February 1943 at Kiel in Germany and included a daring transfer from a German to a Japanese submarine in the Indian coast off the coast of Madagascar on 28 April 1943. Subhas Chandra Bose authographed a photograph with the crew taken just prior to disembarkation: 'It was a great pleasure to sail aboard this submarine… I believe this will mark a milestone in our fight for victory and peace.

Netaji had come across half the globe to accept the leadership of the Indian independence movement in South East Asia. After his escape from India in January 1941 he had gone to Europe in an attempt to win over Indian prisoners-of-war in German and Italian hands to the cause of Indian freedom. The German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941 had upset his plans. The Japanese military advance across South East Asia in December 1941 and early 1942 opened the eastern frontier of Indian to the army of liberation of his dreams. A conference of Indian expatriate patriots at Bangkok on 15 June 1942 had issued him an invitation to lead them in South East Asia. At the time he had been able only to send them a message underscoring the need to 'link up Indian Nationalists all over the world'. A year later he was at last among them, providing that link in person. The presence of well over two million, if not three million (as claimed by the Azad Hind movement), Indian civilians in the region gave his movement in Asia a very large social base of support. From Sabang he first flew to Tokyo to garner support for his armed struggle and Japanese recognition of Indian independence. This twelfth and final volume of Netaji's Collected Works opens with his statements and stirring radio broadcasts from Tokyo. 'Only when the blood of freedom-loving Indians begins to flow,' he declared, 'will India attain her freedom.

On 2 July 1943, Subhas Chandra Bose arrived in Singapore-once 'a bulwark', now 'a graveyard' of the British Empire. He was greeted with the song: 'Subbas-ji, Subhas-ji, woh jaan-e-Hind aagaye,woh naaz jispe Hind ko, woh shan-e-Hindaagaye.' This was just an early indication of the affection and pride that Indians in South East Asia felt for their leader. Two days later, at an enthusiastic representative assembly of Indians in South East Asia held in the Cathay theatre, Netaji accepted the leadership of the Indian Independence League from Rashbehari Bose. The English translation in cold print of his speech in Hindustani on that historic occasion can hardly capture the passion of the delivery and the enthusiasm of the audience's response that can be seen in the film recordings of that day. In ringing tones and elegant Hindustani he told those who were prepared to follow him that he could offer 'nothing but hunger, thirst, privation, forced marches and death' on the journey towards the Red Fort of Delhi. The following day, 5 July 1943, was 'the proudest day' in Netaji's life as he had 'the unique privilege and honour of announcing to the whole world that India's Army of Liberation' had 'come into being. In the months that followed he electrified massive audiences of civilians and soldiers with his speeches in Hindustani and elicited an overwhelmingly positive response to his call for 'total mobilization'. His speeches were instantly translated into Tamil. 'Indians outside India', he told a mass meeting in Singapore on July 1943, 'particularly, Indians in East Asia, are going to organize a fighting force which will be powerful enough to attack the British army of occupation in India. When we do so, a revolution will break out not only among the civilian population at home, but also among - the Indian Army, which is now standing under the British flag. When the British government is thus attacked from both sides-from inside India and from outside-it will collapse and the Indian people will - then regain their liberty.' He had already given his soldiers the slogan 'Chalo Delhi', reminiscent of the 1857 rebellion in India, in the course of his speech on 5 July. From the Indian civilians in South East Asia called for 'total mobilization for a total war'. In return for such mobilization of men and women, money and resources, he promised 'a real second front for the Indian struggle'.

A large majority of Indian expatriates in South East Asia responded with great emotional fevour to this patriotic call for a revolution. At least 18, 000 civilians, mostly Tamils from South India, excluded by the British from their mythology of martial races, enlisted in the Indian National .Army (INA). They received military training alongside professional soldiers from the north-western regions of the subcontinent. Some 40,000 soldiers of Britain's Indian Army forsook their allegiance to the King emperor and professed a new loyalty to Netaji and the cause of India's freedom. 'When Netaji arrived in Singapore,' Shah Nawaz khan explained at the time of the Red Fort trial of November 1945, I watched him very keenly ... I heard a number of his public speeches,·which had a profound effect on me. It will not be wrong to say that I was hypnotized by his personality and his speeches. He placed the true picture of India before us and for the first time in my life. I saw India, through the eyes of an Indian. Many tens of thousands of civiliance joined the numerous local branches of the Indian Independence League that provided support functions of various kinds to the army of liberation. While travelling in the submarine, Subhas Chandra Bose had dictated a speech to Abid Hasan which he planned to deliver to a women's regiment of the INA of his dreams. A torpedo attack had not been permitted to interrupt the dicration The speech was eventually given to the first recruits of the Rani of Jhansi Regiment of a thousand young Indian women from Malaya and Burma-mostly but not exclusively Tamils. In July 1943 the seventeen-year-old Janaki Davar (Thevar) went to hear Subhas Chandra Bose speak at a rally in Kuala Lumpur. At the end of the meeting people rushed forward to give money, jewellery, and anything else they possessed to Netaji. Janaki took off her earrings and gold chain and put them in Netaji's hands. Her parents learnt of what she had done from a photograph on the front page of the local newspaper the next day. When Lakshmi Swaminathan came recruiting for her regiment, Janaki persuaded her father to grant her permission to join. She went with the regiment to Burma in January 1944 and was one of the hundred women who retreated on foot with Subhas Chandra Bose from Burma to Thailand in May 1945.

Netaji undertook a whirlwind tour of various Sourh East Asian countries, galvanizing support for his cause. 'From 1925 to 1927,' he said during a visit to Burma in August 1943, 'I used to gaze from the verandah of my cell in Mandalay prison on the palace of the last in- dependent king of Burma and I used to wonder when Burma would be free once again. Today Burma is an independent state and I am breathing the atmosphere of that liberated country. Netaji tried to send rice from Burma to Bengal which was being decimated by a terrible man-made famine, but his offer was nervously suppressed by the British in India. On 26 September 1943, a ceremonial parade and prayers were held at the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah's tomb in Rangoon to signal the INA's determination to march to the Red Fort of Delhi. 'We Indians, regardless of religious faiths, cherish the memory Bahadur Shah', Netaji said, 'not because he was the man who gave e clarion call to his countrymen to fight the enemy from without, but because he was the man under whose flag fought Indians from all provinces, Indians professing different religious faiths, the man under whose sacred flag ... freedom-loving Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs fought side by side in the war that has been dubbed by English historians as the sepoy mutiny, but which we Indians call the first war of independence.' That spirit of dynamic faith-inspired unity, not listless secular uniformity, was what he wanted to see emulated in 'the last war of independence'.

Contents

 

Dr Sisir Kumar Bose and Netaji's Work

xv

 

Acknowledgements

xviii

 

Introduction

1

1

What British Imperialism Means for India

17

2

Our National Honour

20

3

The Blood of Freedom-Loving Indians The Blood of Freedom-Loving Indians

26

4

This War and its Significance

29

5

The Fable about India

34

6

Subhas Chandra Bose Takes the Lead

37

7

Hunger, Thirst, Privation, Forced Marches and Death

39

8

To Delhi, To Delhi

45

9

Fight Shoulder to Shoulder

49

10

Why I Left Home and Homeland

51

11

Empire that Rose in a Day will Vanish in a Night

55

12

Subhas Chandra Bose Reorganizes the League

60

13

On Jinnah

68

14

Independent Burma

 
 

[i. Press statement on the Achievement of Burma's

 
 

independence on l August 1943]

70

 

[ii. Radio speech on 1 August 1943]

71

 

[iii. Message in Bengali, 1 August 1943]

73

 

[iv. Speech delivered at the Farrer Park, Singapore, on 15 August 1943]

73

15

Spiritual and Military Support to Indians at Home

77

16

The Bengal Famine

79

17

The Servant of 38 Crores of My Countrymen

80

18

My Individuality

82

19

An Amphibious Monster

91

20

At Bahadur Shah's Tomb

97

21

Gandhiji's Part in India's Fight

100

22

A Red Letter Day

106

23

Provisional Government of Free India

 
 

[i. Speech delivered at Singapore on 21 October 1943]

108

 

[ii. Significance of the Provisional Government of

 
 

Free India]

114

 

[iii. Proclamation of the Provisional Government of

 
 

Free India]

117

24

Following in the Footsteps of History

121

25

The Rani of Jhansi Regiment

123

26

The Provisional Government of Azad Hind

128

27

Where is Your Bank Book?

139

28

Netaji at the Assembly of Greater East Asia Nations

146

29

India and Ireland

156

30

Plans of the INA

158

31

Appeal to Chungking

161

32

A Blessing of Providence

163

33

Unification of the Indian Nation

166

34

The Road to Delhi

169

35

The INA is Ready

172

36

Indian National Army in Action

173

37

Homage to the Mother of the Indian People

190

38

The INA on Indian Soil

192

39

True Daughters of Mother India

198

40

Mahatma Gandhi will be Glad when the National

200

41

The East Asia War is Now Our Own War

202

42

Blood and Freedom

205

43

Father of Our Nation

212

44

The Situation in Europe

223

45

The Situation in East Asia

232

46

The Indian Situation

240


47

The Great Patriot and Leader

249

48

Changing Tactics of Enemy Propaganda

254

49

Our Baptism of Fire

264

50

On the Gandhi-Jinnah Meeting

266

51

The Human Spirit is More Powerful than Steel and

269

52

Our First Anniversary

276

53

The Fundamental Problems of India

285

54

The Fate of India

302

55

We Shall Fulfill Our Promise

309

56

Our Immortal Heroes

312

57

Bravery and Cowardice

314

58

End of a Dream

317

59

The Future Generations of Indians Will Bless

319

60

We Fight On

320

61

The German Defeat

328

62

Ill-Treatment of Prisoners of War

331

63

Comment on First Wavell Offer

333

64

No Compromise on Independence

339

65

Wavell's Offer Exposed

349

66

Consign Wavell's Offer to the Scrap Heap

355

67

Reflections on the Wavell Offer

365

68

Reject the Wavell Offer

371

69

No Compromise with Britain

376

70

Britain's Burma Policy

383

71

Co-operation with Japan

385

72

I Am a Revolutionary

390

73

Carryon the Struggle

397

74

A Silver Lining

400

75

Liberty or Death

403

76

Face Any Situation Like Brave Soldiers

406

77

The Roads to Delhi are Many

407

78

India Shall be Free

409

 

Chalo Delhi: Writing and Speeches 1943-1945 (Subhas Chandra Bose)

Item Code:
NAH103
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2007
Publisher:
ISBN:
9788178241791
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
470 (20 B/W Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 740 gms
Price:
$30.00
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$22.50   Shipping Free
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About the Book

After a perilious ninety-day submarine voyage, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose arrived in Southest Asia on 6 May 1943 to lead the indian independence movement. 'Only when the blood of freedom loving Indians begins to flow', he declared in one of his broadcasts in June 1943,'Will India attain his freedom.' In his last message, on 15 August 1945, he urged faith in India's destiny and expressed confidence that 'India shall be free and before long.'

Volume 12 of Netaji's Collected Works brings together all his speeches and writings as leader of the Azad Hind movement from June 1943 to August 1945. His stirring speeches in Singapore, Malaya, and Burma electrified massive audiences of civilians and soldiers, united Indians of all religions, and insired them to join the march towards delhi.

The Proclamation of the Provisional Government of Azad Hind (Free India) in Singapore on 21 October 1943 blends erudition and passion. Netaji's radio address to the 'Father of Our Nation' provides the most detailed justification of his curse of action and seeks the Mahatma's blessings in the 'holy war' raging around Imphal and Kohima. The 'Tokyo thesis' delivered to university faculty and students in November1944 highlights the three supreme challenges for free India-national defence, eradication of poverty, and education for all. His letters-most published here for the young women and men who joined the Indian National Army.

This volume is indispensable for all interested in modern South Asian history and politics, as well as nationalism and international relations in the twentieth century.

About the Author

Sisir Kumar Bose (1920-2000) founded the Netaji Research Bureau in 1957 and was its guiding spirit until his death in 2000. A participant in the Indian freedom struggle, he was imprisoned by the British in the Lahore Fort, Red Fort, and Lyallpur Jail. In the post-independence period he played a key role in preserving the best traditions of he anti-colonial movement and making possible the writing of its history. He authored nad edited biographies, memoirs , monographs, and research papers on Netaji's life and times, One of India's best pediatricians, he was Director and later President of the Institute of Child Health, Calcutta.

Sugata Bose is the Gardiner Professor of History ot Horvard University. He is the author of several books on economic, social and political history, including A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (2006).

Introduction

On 6 May 1943, after a perilous 90-day submarine voyage, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose reached Sabang on the coast of Sumatra. The journey had begun on 8 February 1943 at Kiel in Germany and included a daring transfer from a German to a Japanese submarine in the Indian coast off the coast of Madagascar on 28 April 1943. Subhas Chandra Bose authographed a photograph with the crew taken just prior to disembarkation: 'It was a great pleasure to sail aboard this submarine… I believe this will mark a milestone in our fight for victory and peace.

Netaji had come across half the globe to accept the leadership of the Indian independence movement in South East Asia. After his escape from India in January 1941 he had gone to Europe in an attempt to win over Indian prisoners-of-war in German and Italian hands to the cause of Indian freedom. The German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941 had upset his plans. The Japanese military advance across South East Asia in December 1941 and early 1942 opened the eastern frontier of Indian to the army of liberation of his dreams. A conference of Indian expatriate patriots at Bangkok on 15 June 1942 had issued him an invitation to lead them in South East Asia. At the time he had been able only to send them a message underscoring the need to 'link up Indian Nationalists all over the world'. A year later he was at last among them, providing that link in person. The presence of well over two million, if not three million (as claimed by the Azad Hind movement), Indian civilians in the region gave his movement in Asia a very large social base of support. From Sabang he first flew to Tokyo to garner support for his armed struggle and Japanese recognition of Indian independence. This twelfth and final volume of Netaji's Collected Works opens with his statements and stirring radio broadcasts from Tokyo. 'Only when the blood of freedom-loving Indians begins to flow,' he declared, 'will India attain her freedom.

On 2 July 1943, Subhas Chandra Bose arrived in Singapore-once 'a bulwark', now 'a graveyard' of the British Empire. He was greeted with the song: 'Subbas-ji, Subhas-ji, woh jaan-e-Hind aagaye,woh naaz jispe Hind ko, woh shan-e-Hindaagaye.' This was just an early indication of the affection and pride that Indians in South East Asia felt for their leader. Two days later, at an enthusiastic representative assembly of Indians in South East Asia held in the Cathay theatre, Netaji accepted the leadership of the Indian Independence League from Rashbehari Bose. The English translation in cold print of his speech in Hindustani on that historic occasion can hardly capture the passion of the delivery and the enthusiasm of the audience's response that can be seen in the film recordings of that day. In ringing tones and elegant Hindustani he told those who were prepared to follow him that he could offer 'nothing but hunger, thirst, privation, forced marches and death' on the journey towards the Red Fort of Delhi. The following day, 5 July 1943, was 'the proudest day' in Netaji's life as he had 'the unique privilege and honour of announcing to the whole world that India's Army of Liberation' had 'come into being. In the months that followed he electrified massive audiences of civilians and soldiers with his speeches in Hindustani and elicited an overwhelmingly positive response to his call for 'total mobilization'. His speeches were instantly translated into Tamil. 'Indians outside India', he told a mass meeting in Singapore on July 1943, 'particularly, Indians in East Asia, are going to organize a fighting force which will be powerful enough to attack the British army of occupation in India. When we do so, a revolution will break out not only among the civilian population at home, but also among - the Indian Army, which is now standing under the British flag. When the British government is thus attacked from both sides-from inside India and from outside-it will collapse and the Indian people will - then regain their liberty.' He had already given his soldiers the slogan 'Chalo Delhi', reminiscent of the 1857 rebellion in India, in the course of his speech on 5 July. From the Indian civilians in South East Asia called for 'total mobilization for a total war'. In return for such mobilization of men and women, money and resources, he promised 'a real second front for the Indian struggle'.

A large majority of Indian expatriates in South East Asia responded with great emotional fevour to this patriotic call for a revolution. At least 18, 000 civilians, mostly Tamils from South India, excluded by the British from their mythology of martial races, enlisted in the Indian National .Army (INA). They received military training alongside professional soldiers from the north-western regions of the subcontinent. Some 40,000 soldiers of Britain's Indian Army forsook their allegiance to the King emperor and professed a new loyalty to Netaji and the cause of India's freedom. 'When Netaji arrived in Singapore,' Shah Nawaz khan explained at the time of the Red Fort trial of November 1945, I watched him very keenly ... I heard a number of his public speeches,·which had a profound effect on me. It will not be wrong to say that I was hypnotized by his personality and his speeches. He placed the true picture of India before us and for the first time in my life. I saw India, through the eyes of an Indian. Many tens of thousands of civiliance joined the numerous local branches of the Indian Independence League that provided support functions of various kinds to the army of liberation. While travelling in the submarine, Subhas Chandra Bose had dictated a speech to Abid Hasan which he planned to deliver to a women's regiment of the INA of his dreams. A torpedo attack had not been permitted to interrupt the dicration The speech was eventually given to the first recruits of the Rani of Jhansi Regiment of a thousand young Indian women from Malaya and Burma-mostly but not exclusively Tamils. In July 1943 the seventeen-year-old Janaki Davar (Thevar) went to hear Subhas Chandra Bose speak at a rally in Kuala Lumpur. At the end of the meeting people rushed forward to give money, jewellery, and anything else they possessed to Netaji. Janaki took off her earrings and gold chain and put them in Netaji's hands. Her parents learnt of what she had done from a photograph on the front page of the local newspaper the next day. When Lakshmi Swaminathan came recruiting for her regiment, Janaki persuaded her father to grant her permission to join. She went with the regiment to Burma in January 1944 and was one of the hundred women who retreated on foot with Subhas Chandra Bose from Burma to Thailand in May 1945.

Netaji undertook a whirlwind tour of various Sourh East Asian countries, galvanizing support for his cause. 'From 1925 to 1927,' he said during a visit to Burma in August 1943, 'I used to gaze from the verandah of my cell in Mandalay prison on the palace of the last in- dependent king of Burma and I used to wonder when Burma would be free once again. Today Burma is an independent state and I am breathing the atmosphere of that liberated country. Netaji tried to send rice from Burma to Bengal which was being decimated by a terrible man-made famine, but his offer was nervously suppressed by the British in India. On 26 September 1943, a ceremonial parade and prayers were held at the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah's tomb in Rangoon to signal the INA's determination to march to the Red Fort of Delhi. 'We Indians, regardless of religious faiths, cherish the memory Bahadur Shah', Netaji said, 'not because he was the man who gave e clarion call to his countrymen to fight the enemy from without, but because he was the man under whose flag fought Indians from all provinces, Indians professing different religious faiths, the man under whose sacred flag ... freedom-loving Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs fought side by side in the war that has been dubbed by English historians as the sepoy mutiny, but which we Indians call the first war of independence.' That spirit of dynamic faith-inspired unity, not listless secular uniformity, was what he wanted to see emulated in 'the last war of independence'.

Contents

 

Dr Sisir Kumar Bose and Netaji's Work

xv

 

Acknowledgements

xviii

 

Introduction

1

1

What British Imperialism Means for India

17

2

Our National Honour

20

3

The Blood of Freedom-Loving Indians The Blood of Freedom-Loving Indians

26

4

This War and its Significance

29

5

The Fable about India

34

6

Subhas Chandra Bose Takes the Lead

37

7

Hunger, Thirst, Privation, Forced Marches and Death

39

8

To Delhi, To Delhi

45

9

Fight Shoulder to Shoulder

49

10

Why I Left Home and Homeland

51

11

Empire that Rose in a Day will Vanish in a Night

55

12

Subhas Chandra Bose Reorganizes the League

60

13

On Jinnah

68

14

Independent Burma

 
 

[i. Press statement on the Achievement of Burma's

 
 

independence on l August 1943]

70

 

[ii. Radio speech on 1 August 1943]

71

 

[iii. Message in Bengali, 1 August 1943]

73

 

[iv. Speech delivered at the Farrer Park, Singapore, on 15 August 1943]

73

15

Spiritual and Military Support to Indians at Home

77

16

The Bengal Famine

79

17

The Servant of 38 Crores of My Countrymen

80

18

My Individuality

82

19

An Amphibious Monster

91

20

At Bahadur Shah's Tomb

97

21

Gandhiji's Part in India's Fight

100

22

A Red Letter Day

106

23

Provisional Government of Free India

 
 

[i. Speech delivered at Singapore on 21 October 1943]

108

 

[ii. Significance of the Provisional Government of

 
 

Free India]

114

 

[iii. Proclamation of the Provisional Government of

 
 

Free India]

117

24

Following in the Footsteps of History

121

25

The Rani of Jhansi Regiment

123

26

The Provisional Government of Azad Hind

128

27

Where is Your Bank Book?

139

28

Netaji at the Assembly of Greater East Asia Nations

146

29

India and Ireland

156

30

Plans of the INA

158

31

Appeal to Chungking

161

32

A Blessing of Providence

163

33

Unification of the Indian Nation

166

34

The Road to Delhi

169

35

The INA is Ready

172

36

Indian National Army in Action

173

37

Homage to the Mother of the Indian People

190

38

The INA on Indian Soil

192

39

True Daughters of Mother India

198

40

Mahatma Gandhi will be Glad when the National

200

41

The East Asia War is Now Our Own War

202

42

Blood and Freedom

205

43

Father of Our Nation

212

44

The Situation in Europe

223

45

The Situation in East Asia

232

46

The Indian Situation

240


47

The Great Patriot and Leader

249

48

Changing Tactics of Enemy Propaganda

254

49

Our Baptism of Fire

264

50

On the Gandhi-Jinnah Meeting

266

51

The Human Spirit is More Powerful than Steel and

269

52

Our First Anniversary

276

53

The Fundamental Problems of India

285

54

The Fate of India

302

55

We Shall Fulfill Our Promise

309

56

Our Immortal Heroes

312

57

Bravery and Cowardice

314

58

End of a Dream

317

59

The Future Generations of Indians Will Bless

319

60

We Fight On

320

61

The German Defeat

328

62

Ill-Treatment of Prisoners of War

331

63

Comment on First Wavell Offer

333

64

No Compromise on Independence

339

65

Wavell's Offer Exposed

349

66

Consign Wavell's Offer to the Scrap Heap

355

67

Reflections on the Wavell Offer

365

68

Reject the Wavell Offer

371

69

No Compromise with Britain

376

70

Britain's Burma Policy

383

71

Co-operation with Japan

385

72

I Am a Revolutionary

390

73

Carryon the Struggle

397

74

A Silver Lining

400

75

Liberty or Death

403

76

Face Any Situation Like Brave Soldiers

406

77

The Roads to Delhi are Many

407

78

India Shall be Free

409

 

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