Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_wiki.exoticindiaart.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_wiki.exoticindiaart.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Curious Tales from The Himalayas
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Curious Tales from The Himalayas
Pages from the book
Curious Tales from The Himalayas
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Author

Shaguna Gahilote is a performance storyteller. She is a maths wizard with a double master’s degree, having studied in both India and the UK, where she was a Commonwealth Scholar. She came back to India to work on conserving rare and dying folk art forms. She has worked as an education, peace and culture specialist and helms Ghummakkad Narain: the Travelling Literature Festival and Kathakar: International Storytellers Festival, now in its eight edition.

Shaguna spends her days writing, drawing cartoons, solving maths problems with her nephew and looking after her pet Labrador, Ginger, as well as her neighbourhood strays. She has trotted around the world on a staple diet of potatoes, eggs and hummus.

Prarthana Gahilote has been a journalist with the national media-spanning print, TV and digital platforms-for two decades, with a stint in the UK as a Chevening Scholar. She is the festival director of Kathakar: International Storytellers Festival.

Prarthana suffers from wanderlust and loves walking the Himalayan forest whenever she can escape Delhi or Mumbai. When not occupied with the alphabet, she is found spinning yarns with family and friends, pampering her nephew, Raghav, and her pet, Ginger. She has an ever-growing collection of books, fountain pens and antiques. She directs short films, documentaries and digital concerts. She also writes poetry in Hindustani as well as lyrics for songs. She can’t live without music or gulab jamuns.

Foreword

Our sense of human is passed down by various means, one of which is folktales help preserve the popular wisdom that sustains our human society with love and care. This book contains folktales from the Himalayan region, which will, I am sure, allow readers to take pleasure in its rich culture. I commend the author readers to take pleasure in its rich culture. I commend the authors – two sisters – Prarthana and Shaguna Gahilote for their good work.

Introduction

The stories in this book have been chosen to bring a certain flavour of the Himalaya so the reader, and have been hand-picked from the western, central and eastern Himalaya belt to cover every range. Some of these tales are very popular, others are and a few – one popular – are now lost to the new generation. Some stories here have been reproduced from childhood memories, while others, whose details were lost, had to be researched and many others were found during our travels and treks in the mountains! There is no one tale that can be described as the first version ever told, or one that forms the basis of all other folk tales. As people travelled along the Silk, the Incense and the Spice Routes, they carried with them folklore and folk tales. So a story that one might have heard as a child in a village in India could be a folk tale from England or Russia, because these fables have travelled across the world since ancient times and have been adapted to each country to suit its cultural ethos.

As we researched the stories for this book, we found varied version of the same tale spanning many different regions. We’ve tried to stick to the one we believe is the relevant. For some, missing portions were pieced together from other versions.

Folklorists around the world believe that folk tales prepare children for the future, which is why life’s darkest lessons are told through demons and witches. These supernatural beings in the stories may be manifestations of man’s inhuman emotions. Older tales have evil stepmothers and stepsisters, a reflection of those times, when woman would often die during childbirth, and kids had to grow up to face a cruel world, moulding their own lives as they grew up. Folk tales were woven with so much mystery and magic, always ending in happily ever after, that the lessons were conveyed without being preachy.

And then there is the perennial discussion regarding folk tales having too many graphic and gruesome details. Should we be telling stories of evil parents, uncles and aunts to children, or should we spare them the nasty details, like those in ‘Tejimola’, ‘Lakshi, Dulal and the Monkeys’ and even ‘Hansel and Gretel’? Psychologists explain that children have their own interpretation of these stories and understand them differently from adults. They absorb the essence of a story without getting consumed by the macabre details. This is why tales have to be told without adding ‘So the moral of the story is’ at the end. Of tale, folk tales have been pushed to teach from this restriction. Stories need to be told as stories, free of any labels, so that children can image them as they like.

Stories are constantly being lost; parents heading nuclear families have little time to tell tales to their children, and technology has given kids many other tools to interact and engage with. But stories have a shelf life far longer than fads and trends do. Stories last for generations, reviving themselves around campfires, spitting up flames, hibernating during the winter and blooming again with the sun in spring-spreading like the fragrance of the rhododendrons in the Himalayas for anyone who wishes to drink them in and share!

Contents

Forewordix
Introductionxi
The Red Fox and the Meditating Monk Frog1
The Bowl of Thenthuk7
Kaala Paaja15
Kali and Ghughuti 23
Tears of Blood31
Kesha Chandra and Gurumapa40
Rongnyu and Rongeet54
Lakshmi Dulal and the Monkeys61
Tejimola73
Bumo Sing Sing Yangdonma83
The Flying Monks93
Acknowledgements101
Sample Pages





Curious Tales from The Himalayas

Deal 20% Off
Item Code:
NAO390
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2017
Publisher:
ISBN:
9780143428602
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
116
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 100 gms
Price:
$21.00
Discounted:
$16.80   Shipping Free
You Save:
$4.20 (20%)
Look Inside the Book
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Curious Tales from The Himalayas
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 1279 times since 6th Nov, 2018
About the Author

Shaguna Gahilote is a performance storyteller. She is a maths wizard with a double master’s degree, having studied in both India and the UK, where she was a Commonwealth Scholar. She came back to India to work on conserving rare and dying folk art forms. She has worked as an education, peace and culture specialist and helms Ghummakkad Narain: the Travelling Literature Festival and Kathakar: International Storytellers Festival, now in its eight edition.

Shaguna spends her days writing, drawing cartoons, solving maths problems with her nephew and looking after her pet Labrador, Ginger, as well as her neighbourhood strays. She has trotted around the world on a staple diet of potatoes, eggs and hummus.

Prarthana Gahilote has been a journalist with the national media-spanning print, TV and digital platforms-for two decades, with a stint in the UK as a Chevening Scholar. She is the festival director of Kathakar: International Storytellers Festival.

Prarthana suffers from wanderlust and loves walking the Himalayan forest whenever she can escape Delhi or Mumbai. When not occupied with the alphabet, she is found spinning yarns with family and friends, pampering her nephew, Raghav, and her pet, Ginger. She has an ever-growing collection of books, fountain pens and antiques. She directs short films, documentaries and digital concerts. She also writes poetry in Hindustani as well as lyrics for songs. She can’t live without music or gulab jamuns.

Foreword

Our sense of human is passed down by various means, one of which is folktales help preserve the popular wisdom that sustains our human society with love and care. This book contains folktales from the Himalayan region, which will, I am sure, allow readers to take pleasure in its rich culture. I commend the author readers to take pleasure in its rich culture. I commend the authors – two sisters – Prarthana and Shaguna Gahilote for their good work.

Introduction

The stories in this book have been chosen to bring a certain flavour of the Himalaya so the reader, and have been hand-picked from the western, central and eastern Himalaya belt to cover every range. Some of these tales are very popular, others are and a few – one popular – are now lost to the new generation. Some stories here have been reproduced from childhood memories, while others, whose details were lost, had to be researched and many others were found during our travels and treks in the mountains! There is no one tale that can be described as the first version ever told, or one that forms the basis of all other folk tales. As people travelled along the Silk, the Incense and the Spice Routes, they carried with them folklore and folk tales. So a story that one might have heard as a child in a village in India could be a folk tale from England or Russia, because these fables have travelled across the world since ancient times and have been adapted to each country to suit its cultural ethos.

As we researched the stories for this book, we found varied version of the same tale spanning many different regions. We’ve tried to stick to the one we believe is the relevant. For some, missing portions were pieced together from other versions.

Folklorists around the world believe that folk tales prepare children for the future, which is why life’s darkest lessons are told through demons and witches. These supernatural beings in the stories may be manifestations of man’s inhuman emotions. Older tales have evil stepmothers and stepsisters, a reflection of those times, when woman would often die during childbirth, and kids had to grow up to face a cruel world, moulding their own lives as they grew up. Folk tales were woven with so much mystery and magic, always ending in happily ever after, that the lessons were conveyed without being preachy.

And then there is the perennial discussion regarding folk tales having too many graphic and gruesome details. Should we be telling stories of evil parents, uncles and aunts to children, or should we spare them the nasty details, like those in ‘Tejimola’, ‘Lakshi, Dulal and the Monkeys’ and even ‘Hansel and Gretel’? Psychologists explain that children have their own interpretation of these stories and understand them differently from adults. They absorb the essence of a story without getting consumed by the macabre details. This is why tales have to be told without adding ‘So the moral of the story is’ at the end. Of tale, folk tales have been pushed to teach from this restriction. Stories need to be told as stories, free of any labels, so that children can image them as they like.

Stories are constantly being lost; parents heading nuclear families have little time to tell tales to their children, and technology has given kids many other tools to interact and engage with. But stories have a shelf life far longer than fads and trends do. Stories last for generations, reviving themselves around campfires, spitting up flames, hibernating during the winter and blooming again with the sun in spring-spreading like the fragrance of the rhododendrons in the Himalayas for anyone who wishes to drink them in and share!

Contents

Forewordix
Introductionxi
The Red Fox and the Meditating Monk Frog1
The Bowl of Thenthuk7
Kaala Paaja15
Kali and Ghughuti 23
Tears of Blood31
Kesha Chandra and Gurumapa40
Rongnyu and Rongeet54
Lakshmi Dulal and the Monkeys61
Tejimola73
Bumo Sing Sing Yangdonma83
The Flying Monks93
Acknowledgements101
Sample Pages





Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Curious Tales from The Himalayas (Language and Literature | Books)

The Land of Flying Lamas (& other Real Travel Stories from the Indian Himalaya)
by Gaurav Punj
Paperback (Edition: 2013)
Tranquebar Press
Item Code: NAG630
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Simla Village Tales: Folktales From The Himalayas
Deal 20% Off
by Alice Elizabeth Dracott
Paperback (Edition: 2003)
Pilgrims Publishing
Item Code: IDI945
$14.50$11.60
You save: $2.90 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Water for Pabolee (Stories about People and Development in the Himalayas)
Deal 20% Off
by Robert C. Alter
Hardcover (Edition: 2002)
Orient Longman Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDG487
$38.50$30.80
You save: $7.70 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Rain in The Mountains (Notes From the Himalayas)
Deal 20% Off
by Ruskin Bond
Paperback (Edition: 1996)
Penguin Books
Item Code: NAD633
$29.00$23.20
You save: $5.80 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Pilgrimage To The Himalayas (and Other Silhouettes From Memory)
Deal 20% Off
by Mahadevi Verma
Paperback (Edition: 2002)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDH229
$16.00$12.80
You save: $3.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Mountain Bound (Writings From The Himalaya)
Deal 20% Off
by Lucia de Vries
Paperback (Edition: 2018)
Vajra Books, Nepal
Item Code: NAO975
$43.00$34.40
You save: $8.60 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Official Biography of Swami Rama of The Himalayas
by Pandit Rajmani Tigunait
Paperback (Edition: 2001)
Himalayan Institute
Item Code: NAI023
$28.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
My Trees in The Himalayas
Deal 20% Off
by Ruskin Bond
Paperback (Edition: 2018)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAP402
$16.00$12.80
You save: $3.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Himalaya (Adventures, Meditations and Life)
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAP188
$31.00$24.80
You save: $6.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Gender in The Himalaya (Feminist Explorations of Identity, Place and Positionality)
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAM666
$36.00$28.80
You save: $7.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Drokpa (Nomads of The Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya)
by Daniel J. Miller
Paperback (Edition: 2008)
Vajra Books, Nepal
Item Code: NAM704
$52.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Medicinal Flora of Garhwal Himalayas
by Dr. M.R. Uniyal
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Chaukhambha Orientalia
Item Code: NAI324
$33.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Namaste and many thanks! Lovely collection you have! Tempted to buy so many books!
Revathi, USA
I received my order. Thanks for giving the platform to purchase artifacts of our culture. You guys are doing a great job. Appreciate it and wish you guys the best.
Manju, USA
Fantastic! Thank You for amazing service and fast replies!
Sonia, Sweden
I’ve started receiving many of the books I’ve ordered and every single one of them (thus far) has been fantastic - both the books themselves, and the execution of the shipping. Safe to say I’ll be ordering many more books from your website :)
Hithesh, USA
I have received the book Evolution II.  Thank you so much for all of your assistance in making this book available to me.  You have been so helpful and kind.
Colleen, USA
Thanks Exotic India, I just received a set of two volume books: Brahmasutra Catuhsutri Sankara Bhasyam
I Gede Tunas
You guys are beyond amazing. The books you provide not many places have and I for one am so thankful to have found you.
Lulian, UK
This is my first purchase from Exotic India and its really good to have such store with online buying option. Thanks, looking ahead to purchase many more such exotic product from you.
Probir, UAE
I received the kaftan today via FedEx. Your care in sending the order, packaging and methods, are exquisite. You have dressed my body in comfort and fashion for my constrained quarantine in the several kaftans ordered in the last 6 months. And I gifted my sister with one of the orders. So pleased to have made a connection with you.
EB Cuya FIGG, USA
Thank you for your wonderful service and amazing book selection. We are long time customers and have never been disappointed by your great store. Thank you and we will continue to shop at your store
Michael, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India