Warning: include(domaintitles/domaintitle_wiki.exoticindiaart.php3): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'domaintitles/domaintitle_wiki.exoticindiaart.php3' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/exotic/newexotic/header.php3 on line 921

Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa
Pages from the book
Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa
Look Inside the Book
Description
Introduction

Unlike the Vikramorvasiya and the Sakuntala, the Malavikagnimitra is simply and solely a drama. Though the very first dramatic composition of Kalidasa, it is the composition of one who possessed the highest dramatic sense. That it is the very first of Kalidasa's plays hardly requires any elaborate argument to prove. The Prologue shows the young dramatist apologetically asking to be excused for his obtrusion into the realm of the dramatic art which Bhasa and Saumilla and Kaviputra held in esteem. This Prologue reveals a novice's modesty which is—naturally enough— absent in the prologues of the other two plays which came after Kalidasa's fame as a dramatist was already established.

Contents
A brief account of the the plot.
Act I
A maid-servant of Dharini, the eldest queen of King Agnimitra, is carrying a ring with the image of a snake on it, when she meets another, Bakulavalika by name, who was going to Ganadasa, the dancing-teacher, to enquire how Malavika, the young girl recently placed under him, was progressing in her dancing lessons. The conversation that ensues between the two reveals how the King once went to the studio where the queen was inspecting a fresh portrait of hers with Malavika's figure drawn prominently among the servants. On seeing this figure of a stranger, the King asked who she was. The queen hesitated to reply but the child princess Vasumati (who was a sister to the queen) interposed : "Sir it is Malavika." Thenceforward the queen took greater precautions to keep Malavika away from the eyes of her husband. The maid-servants then go their own way. Then enters Ganadasa in a mood of self-exaltation : "Of course, every one thinks highly of his hereditary lore. But it is no idle sense of importance we cherish regarding 'the representational art. For, sages look upon it as a lovely visual sacrifice to gods; it was divided into two by Rudra in his own body which was shared by Uma. Herein are seen the actions of the people inspired by the three Qualities and varied in sentiments. Indeed Natya is the one common means of entertaining people, however widely their tastes might differ." He speaks with admiration about Malavika's intellectual gifts and shows a natural curiosity about her identity and antecedents. Bakulavalika informs him that Malavika was sent as a 'present' to the queen by her step-brother, Virasena, who was a commander in charge of a frontier-fortress on the banks of the Narmada.

In the next scene the King is seen looking into state affairs in consulation with his minister and ordering military operations against the Vidarbha King, who had not sent a satisfactory reply about the release of his own cousin, Madhavasena, who was attacked and taken prisoner by Vidarbha officers while he, along with his younger sister, was on his way to Agnimitra's capital with a view to offering her hand to him in marriage. The state business over the Vidusaka arrives "our minister in charge of another department," as the King describes him. The Vidusaka informs the King about the plan he had thought out—and even put into execution—for satisfying his desire to see Malavika in person. Just then they hear angry voices behind the curtain, whereupon the King remarks to the Vidusaka, "Friend, here's the tree of your good stratagem putting forth blossoms!" Ganadasa and Haradatta, both dancing teachers enjoying the patronage of the queen and the King respectively, have quarrelled among themselves; so they come to the King and request him to test them in their art and adjudge their relative merits. The King, however, declines to act as the judge as he might be suspected of partiality for his own protege, Haradatta. He therefore decides that the contest must be held in the presence of the queen, too. The queen arrives there in the company of the learned nun Pandita Kausiki The latter is invited to officiate as the Judge. The queen smells some deep-laid, plan in the whole affair but much against her will she consents to the holding of the contest. The nun Parivrajika (as she is called) rules that in view of the perfect mastery on the part of the two contesting dancing-teachers over their art, their relative merits must be adjudged in terms of their ability and skill in imparting their art to others; and therefore each one was to give an exhibition of his art through his pupil. Naturally, Ganadasa staked his all on Malavika of whose superb qualities he was in no doubt whatever. The arrangements in the theatre are made : the sound of the drums is heard, and the royal party leaves for the theatre to witness the demonstration.

Contents

Introduction vii
Text and Translation  
नान्दी 1
प्रथमोअंक: 10
द्वितीयोंअंकः 28
तृतीयोअंकः 40
चतुर्थोअंकः 73
पंचमोअंकः 106
श्लोकसूची 135

Sample Pages







Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa

Item Code:
NAO767
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2013
ISBN:
9788183152310
Language:
Sanskrit Text With English Translation
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
158
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 170 gms
Price:
$16.00
Discounted:
$12.00   Shipping Free
You Save:
$4.00 (25%)
Look Inside the Book
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 2041 times since 1st Mar, 2019
Introduction

Unlike the Vikramorvasiya and the Sakuntala, the Malavikagnimitra is simply and solely a drama. Though the very first dramatic composition of Kalidasa, it is the composition of one who possessed the highest dramatic sense. That it is the very first of Kalidasa's plays hardly requires any elaborate argument to prove. The Prologue shows the young dramatist apologetically asking to be excused for his obtrusion into the realm of the dramatic art which Bhasa and Saumilla and Kaviputra held in esteem. This Prologue reveals a novice's modesty which is—naturally enough— absent in the prologues of the other two plays which came after Kalidasa's fame as a dramatist was already established.

Contents
A brief account of the the plot.
Act I
A maid-servant of Dharini, the eldest queen of King Agnimitra, is carrying a ring with the image of a snake on it, when she meets another, Bakulavalika by name, who was going to Ganadasa, the dancing-teacher, to enquire how Malavika, the young girl recently placed under him, was progressing in her dancing lessons. The conversation that ensues between the two reveals how the King once went to the studio where the queen was inspecting a fresh portrait of hers with Malavika's figure drawn prominently among the servants. On seeing this figure of a stranger, the King asked who she was. The queen hesitated to reply but the child princess Vasumati (who was a sister to the queen) interposed : "Sir it is Malavika." Thenceforward the queen took greater precautions to keep Malavika away from the eyes of her husband. The maid-servants then go their own way. Then enters Ganadasa in a mood of self-exaltation : "Of course, every one thinks highly of his hereditary lore. But it is no idle sense of importance we cherish regarding 'the representational art. For, sages look upon it as a lovely visual sacrifice to gods; it was divided into two by Rudra in his own body which was shared by Uma. Herein are seen the actions of the people inspired by the three Qualities and varied in sentiments. Indeed Natya is the one common means of entertaining people, however widely their tastes might differ." He speaks with admiration about Malavika's intellectual gifts and shows a natural curiosity about her identity and antecedents. Bakulavalika informs him that Malavika was sent as a 'present' to the queen by her step-brother, Virasena, who was a commander in charge of a frontier-fortress on the banks of the Narmada.

In the next scene the King is seen looking into state affairs in consulation with his minister and ordering military operations against the Vidarbha King, who had not sent a satisfactory reply about the release of his own cousin, Madhavasena, who was attacked and taken prisoner by Vidarbha officers while he, along with his younger sister, was on his way to Agnimitra's capital with a view to offering her hand to him in marriage. The state business over the Vidusaka arrives "our minister in charge of another department," as the King describes him. The Vidusaka informs the King about the plan he had thought out—and even put into execution—for satisfying his desire to see Malavika in person. Just then they hear angry voices behind the curtain, whereupon the King remarks to the Vidusaka, "Friend, here's the tree of your good stratagem putting forth blossoms!" Ganadasa and Haradatta, both dancing teachers enjoying the patronage of the queen and the King respectively, have quarrelled among themselves; so they come to the King and request him to test them in their art and adjudge their relative merits. The King, however, declines to act as the judge as he might be suspected of partiality for his own protege, Haradatta. He therefore decides that the contest must be held in the presence of the queen, too. The queen arrives there in the company of the learned nun Pandita Kausiki The latter is invited to officiate as the Judge. The queen smells some deep-laid, plan in the whole affair but much against her will she consents to the holding of the contest. The nun Parivrajika (as she is called) rules that in view of the perfect mastery on the part of the two contesting dancing-teachers over their art, their relative merits must be adjudged in terms of their ability and skill in imparting their art to others; and therefore each one was to give an exhibition of his art through his pupil. Naturally, Ganadasa staked his all on Malavika of whose superb qualities he was in no doubt whatever. The arrangements in the theatre are made : the sound of the drums is heard, and the royal party leaves for the theatre to witness the demonstration.

Contents

Introduction vii
Text and Translation  
नान्दी 1
प्रथमोअंक: 10
द्वितीयोंअंकः 28
तृतीयोअंकः 40
चतुर्थोअंकः 73
पंचमोअंकः 106
श्लोकसूची 135

Sample Pages







Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa (Language and Literature | Books)

Works of Kalidasa: Three Plays -  Abhijnanasakuntalam, Vikramorvasiyam, Malavikagnimitram (Volume I)
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAL996
$47.00$28.20
You save: $18.80 (20 + 25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kalidasa's Malavikagnimitram
Item Code: IDJ453
$37.00$27.75
You save: $9.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Works of Kalidasa (In Two Volumes): Sanskrit Text, English Translation and Detailed Notes
Item Code: IDK052
$90.00$67.50
You save: $22.50 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kalidasa’s Trilogy
by Dipavali Debroy
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
Winsome Books India
Item Code: NAD393
$29.00$21.75
You save: $7.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kalidasa: For The 21st Century Reader
by Mani Rao
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Aleph Book Company
Item Code: NAM469
$31.00$23.25
You save: $7.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Short History of Sanskrit Literature
Item Code: IDD844
$21.00$15.75
You save: $5.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Feminine Beauty in Indian Art and Literature
Deal 20% Off
by T.N. Mishra
Hardcover (Edition: 2007)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDK123
$43.00$25.80
You save: $17.20 (20 + 25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Complete Works of Kalidasa (Volume II)
by Chandra Rajan
Hardcover (Edition: 2014)
Sahitya Akademi, Delhi
Item Code: NAK356
$43.00$32.25
You save: $10.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Selected Episodes From Raghuvamsam of Kalidasa
by Kireeti Joshi
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Shubhra Ketu Foundation
Item Code: NAD073
$18.50$13.88
You save: $4.62 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Methodology of Ancient Indian Sciences
by W. K. Lele
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Chaukhamba Surbharati Prakashan
Item Code: IDG394
$43.00$32.25
You save: $10.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Works of Kalidasa (Volume II)
Item Code: NAL997
$47.00$35.25
You save: $11.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Complete Works of Kalidasa (Set of 2 Volumes)
by Chandra Rajan
Hardcover (Edition: 2014)
Sahitya Akademi, Delhi
Item Code: NAK046
$77.00$57.75
You save: $19.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Sacred Songs of India  (Vol. VIII)
by V. K. Subramanian
Hardcover (Edition: 2006)
Abhinav Publication
Item Code: IDI132
$23.50$17.62
You save: $5.88 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Shattered Thigh (And Other Plays) (Bhasa)
Item Code: NAE998
$13.50$10.12
You save: $3.38 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Thank you for really great prices compared to other sellers. I have recommended your website to over 40 of my classmates.
Kimia, USA
I am so happy to have found you!! What a wonderful source for books of Indian origin at reasonable cost! Thank you!
Urvi, USA
I very much appreciate your web site and the products you have available. I especially like the ancient cookbooks you have and am always looking for others here to share with my friends.
Sam, USA
Very good service thank you. Keep up the good work !
Charles, Switzerland
Namaste! Thank you for your kind assistance! I would like to inform that your package arrived today and all is very well. I appreciate all your support and definitively will continue ordering form your company again in the near future!
Lizette, Puerto Rico
I just wanted to thank you again, mere dost, for shipping the Nataraj. We now have it in our home, thanks to you and Exotic India. We are most grateful. Bahut dhanyavad!
Drea and Kalinidi, Ireland
I am extremely very happy to see an Indian website providing arts, crafts and books from all over India and dispatching to all over the world ! Great work, keep it going. Looking forward to more and more purchase from you. Thank you for your service.
Vrunda
We have always enjoyed your products.
Elizabeth, USA
Thank you for the prompt delivery of the bowl, which I am very satisfied with.
Frans, the Netherlands
I have received my books and they are in perfect condition. You provide excellent service to your customers, DHL too, and I thank you for that. I recommended you to my friend who is the director of the Aurobindo bookstore.
Mr. Forget from Montreal
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India